Poetry compare-contrast paper 1st draft DUE NOV. 7

Filed Under Teaching | Comments Off on Poetry compare-contrast paper 1st draft DUE NOV. 7

We have spent the last nine weeks reading and analyzing poetry. The past two weeks have focused on poetry about love and death. Even when poets have a similar theme about a topic, the way they approach it is unique.


Your task is to select love or death and then discuss how three different poets – that have been presented by your peers – deal with the topic. Areas of comparing and contrasting you might consider include: Read more

Death Be Not Proud analysis

Filed Under Teaching | Comments Off on Death Be Not Proud analysis

Ms. Harger

Harger

UCONN/AP Composition and Literature

10 October 2012

Victory over Death in “Death Be Not Proud”

John Donne (1573-1631) is considered the founder of the Metaphysical Poetry movement, a group that included George Herbert and Andrew Marvell. According to Poets.org, the Metaphysical Poets “are known for their ability to startle the reader and coax new perspective through paradoxical images, subtle argument, inventive syntax, and imagery from art, philosophy, and religion using an extended metaphor known as a conceit.” A conceit is an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. By juxtaposing, usurping and manipulating images and ideas in surprising ways, a conceit invites the reader into a more sophisticated understanding of an object of comparison. Donne’s poetry in particular reflected the exploratory spirit of late 16th and early 17th England, when the country was claiming territory in America and establishing itself as a world power. Read more

Annabel Lee analysis

Filed Under Teaching | Comments Off on Annabel Lee analysis

Ms. Harger

Harger

UCONN/AP Literature and Composition

9 October 2012

Exploring Love in “Annabel Lee”

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was an American writer, journalist and literary critic who was considered part of the American Romantic literary movement and more specifically the Gothic movement. The Romantic movement can be defined thusly: “Romantic writers (and artists) saw themselves as revolting against the “Age of Reason” (1700-1770) and its values. They celebrated imagination/intuition versus reason/calculation, spontaneity versus control, subjectivity and metaphysical musing versus objective fact, revolutionary energy versus tradition, individualism versus social conformity, democracy versus monarchy, and so on” (Harvey). The Gothic movement was preoccupied with medieval, wild or mysterious elements, and often featured spooky castles where terrifying supernatural events take place. Read more

Free Verse presentation

Filed Under Teaching | Comments Off on Free Verse presentation

Free verse (or vers libre) is poetry that is based on the irregular rhythmic cadence (recurring rhythms) or the recurrence, with variations, of phrases, images, and syntactical patterns rather than the conventional use of meter. Rhyme may or may not be present in free verse, but when it is, it is used with great freedom. In conventional verse the unit is the foot, or the line; in free verse the units are larger, sometimes being paragraphs or strophes. If the free verse unit is the line, as it is in Whitman, the line is determined by qualities of rhythm and thought rather than feet or syllabic count. Read more

AP Poetry Close Reading Assignment 10-5-12

Filed Under Teaching | Comments Off on AP Poetry Close Reading Assignment 10-5-12


Close Reading



NOTE: I am allowing pairs on this, but it means each pair has to do 2 poems.

Over the past few weeks, we have been discussing ways to approach the analysis of poetry. Now, you are going to take the lead and teach the poems in depth. Read more

AP Poetry Writing Assignment 10-5-12

Filed Under Teaching | Comments Off on AP Poetry Writing Assignment 10-5-12


You’re a Poet (and didn’t know it)


For this assignment, you will compose at least 14 lines of poetry. Your poem(s) should follow one of the following forms: Read more